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is found in those cities where the city fathers built the internet for their community, just like city fathers in some places built their own electric system when the big utilities wouldn't pay any attention to them in the late 19th century. >> reporter: now all this is strong stuff. so strong that we sought out the other side: the cable industry itself. michael powell, head of the federal communications commission under president george w. bush, is now president of the national cable television association. >> many of these state-owned local utilities have often failed because of financial hardship and rarely are offering speeds that are faster or cheaper than what's provided privately. even in glasgow, kentucky the top speed is only 6 megabits per second for $36. that's hardly exceptional. it's certainly no better than what's being provided in the private market. >> reporter: where average speeds are three times as fast, claims powell and prices are falling, not rising. >> the price per megabit per second has decreased 87% since 1999. in fact in 2010, the federal communications commi
were in the city of hillah, south of baghdad. back-to-back explosions targeted shi-ite pilgrims and emergency responders. the force of the blasts left twisted wreckage of cars outside shops in a busy commercial area. a third bombing killed six people near a shrine in the city of karbala. a year-long inquiry into british media practices ended today with a call for new regulation. lord justice brian leveson led the investigation. it was triggered by a scandal over a tabloid newspaper-- owned by the murdoch conglomerate-- that hacked voice-mails of hundreds of people. we have a report from gary gibbon of "independent television news." >> reporter: they say the body that regulars the newspapers can't be run by newspapers alone anymore. it needs to be more independent and overseen by a government watchdog. >> this is not and cannot reasonably or fairly be characterized as statutory regulation of the press. i am proposeing inspect regulation of the press organized by the press. >> reporter: but david cameron said the judge had got it wrong. laws controlling newspapers could mushroom i
jobs are in consumer banking. the move comes less than two months since a shakeup at citi ousting former c.e.o., vikram pandit. he was succeeded by michael corbat. the bank nearly collapsed during the crisis and ultimately received bailouts totaling $45 billion, money that citi has since repaid. roben farzhad has long watched the changes at citi for bloomberg "businessweek" and joins us again tonight. roben, welcome. today we heard that stocks soared on the news of these layoffs. what does that tell us about what was going on at citi? >> it's sad, actually. citigroup is know-- you could say the financial crisis is over but in the throes of an existential crisis. it doesn't know what it wants to be. investors have been clamoring for a while for citigroup to simplify, to shed payrolls, to be good at something. it does everything, but it isn't market leading, necessarily, in any one category. and by and large, they got the layoffs, at least the beginning round of layoffs that they wanted today. >> ifill: we know many of these layoffs are noin the u.s., but i assume part of the relati
will take a look. >> the center of mexico city is on lockdown. hours to go before he is officially sworn in as president, it has been put in place outside of parliamentary buildings for days. >> i know that the president -- >> the president-elect has been making friends north of the border. in washington, he assured president obama he was proposing a new security strategy to try to reduce the drug-related violence that marked his predecessor's time in office. far from the white house is the tourist resort. the only political experience before winning the presidency was his government here. it is one of the projects he is remembered fondly for in the town as well as building a new infrastructure. his friend and political allies have rejected the suggestion that the president is all style and no substance. >> he is a very straightforward man, very committed with an excellent vision of the country , an excellent statement, and he knows how to listen. dodge a municipality on the outskirts of mexico city where the tentacles of the drug violence have started to reach. it is a particular proble
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> we shall go on to the end. we shall fight in france. we shall fight on the seas and oceans. we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air. we shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be. we shall fight on the beaches. we shall fight on the landing grounds. we shall fight in the fields and in the streets. we shall fight in the hills. we shall never surrender. >> rose: winston church sill recognized as one of the greatest statesmen of all times. in 1954 edward r. murrow the cbs newsman said he mobilized the english language and sent it into battle. president kennedy liked the quote so much that he used it as his own. that was in 1963 when he granted winston churchill honorary citizenship of the united states. >> pierpont morgan was a friend of churchill's mother and is likely that winston on one of his many trip to its united states would have visited this library. we're joined today by alan packwood, he is the director of the churchill archive center in cambridge. and he's cure rating an ex
ós captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >>. >> getting ready. >>. >> by military forces it would be some change in the chemical weapons whether they wanted to move them or whether they plan if syrians have always said they will not use these weapons on their own people. do they now -- go ahead. >> that's right and president obama in august clearly delineated those red lines that if they were to move these out of their storage site or to employ them against the syrian people or anyone else that would be a trigger point for some type of western action. now, depending -- the pentagon has drawn up preliminary plans to send as many as 75,000 troops into syria to secure these chemical weapons sites, but as of just today there have been no signs that any of those forces have been put on alert or there was any detail planning to do this. so there was some question here of whether assad may be calling t president's bluff. >> rose: and what exactly do you think they would be prepared to do and what would trigger that? clearly t
up your tank now compared to a year ago. erika miller reports from one of the most expensive cities to fill 'er up. >> reporter: here in new york city, the long lines and gas rationing are finally gone, but there's more good news. like the rest of the nation, gas is actually cheaper now than before superstorm sandy. a month ago, superstorm sandy shut down refineries in the northeast, delayed oil shipments and left many gasoline stations without power. in some hard hit areas, prices spiked more than ten cents a gallon. but now, the situation has drastically improved here and around the country. regular unleaded costs an average of $3.42 nationwide. that's 12 cents below where it was a month ago. but drivers are still paying about 12 cents more for gas today than a year ago. a big reason is escalating middle east tensions. >> anytime you have that kind of conflict in the middle east, whether it's the israelis or the egyptians, the syrians, it really the disruption of flow, you know. any time you get a problem in the gulf, it's really going to hinder oil prices. >> reporter: if the rec
of the most visited holiday landmarks in the city. and tom, the big board's tree is embroiled in a twitter battle for bragging rights as the city's best with another famous tree, the one at rockefeller center.. >> on my way to work this morning, i saw the tree by the new york stock exchange, and it looks pretty impressive. >> tom: we saw you putting ornaments on it. but the trees are tweeting? is that right? >> susie: not quite right, and those trees are a little too high for me to reach to put an ornament. that's "nightly business report" for tuesday, december 4. have a great evening, everyone, and you, too, tom. >> tom: good night, susie. we'll see you online at nbr.com, and back here tomorrow night. captioning sponsored by wpbt captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >>> it all started with a single lemon squeezer, and now 30 years later, bonnie grossman's house is filled with collections of all kinds. kitchen utensils, medicines, walking sticks, bottle whimsies, quilts, tramp art, little houses, and the work of self-taught artists, like alex maldonado. for bonnie, each
of a recovery home prices went up in most major u.s. cities by 3% in september compared to a year ago. america's ambassador to the u.n. failed to mollify senate critics today on the attack at the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. susan rice met with republican senators who've criticized her for saying-- five days after the attack-- that anti-american protests were to blame. in fact, u.s. officials already knew it was a terrorist strike. today, rice blamed faulty intelligence. but senator lindsey graham said he was unimpressed. bottom line, i'm more disturbed now than i was before that the 16 september explanation about how four americans died in benghazi libya by ambassador rice i think does not do justice to the reality at the time and in hindsight clearly was completely wrong. >> sreenivasan: graham, along with senators mccain and ayotte, have said they'll oppose rice if she's nominated to be secretary of state. but independent senator joe lieberman also met with rice today, and he said he was satisfied with her explanation of events. >> i found her statements to be significant. she was jus
's years. that is the worst feeling. it is corrosive and in cities to be writing a song, and half with through -- maybe you are excited about the song. maybe it is meaningful to you. halfway through, you go, they are not going to like it. it is deflating. it is really hard to not be affected by it. i like to feel i am a person who says, i do not care what other people think. i think the act of being a musician is so much about being open and empathetic, and not having these boundaries. you cannot control some of the negative stuff that comes in. i feel like i should not have been affected by that, but i admit that i was, and i have them, in other ways. i have been. it is a terrible feeling to go, i thought this was pretty good, but it is not going to be good in the right way. maybe good is just not interesting. tavis: i hear that wrestling, and yet i am trying to figure out, for you, and even for myself -- everyone of us is an artist in our own right in something. you have to figure out where that line is. on the one hand, you cannot totally not care. you cannot be devoid of that
-- and crash to the road below? and why had the tunnel past the city in best -- passed the safety inspection just months ago? >> they will quickly take measures to prevent similar accidents. >> that work began with a hammer and chisel. across japan, there are thought to be at least 49 tunnels of similar age and designed to the one that collapsed. it will take a lot of workers an awful long time to check every inch of every one like this. the question people are asking here is why wasn't it done before. bbc news, yoky -- tokyo. >> it is nearly 25 years since saddam hussein's forces killed thousands of iraqi kurds with chemical weapons. now the kurdistan regional government is trying to establish the attack as an internationally-recognized act of genocide. they are seeking help to dig up and identify the dead. we have one of the first journalist to report from the scene. he has returned to assess the continuing fallout. >> i would not have recognized the place. it is now busy and expanding fast. however bustling it may be, no one here forgets the gas attacks of march, 1988. saddam hussein's pl
city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we are at the supreme court of the united states in washington, the nine justices that occupy its chambers carry a heavy responsibility. they have the final say on the law of the land. the principles and idea that guide their decisions are the subject of heated debate. justice antonin scalia is the longest serving justice currently on the court, he is the leading voice for a conservative judicial philosophy known as textualism, some talk about it as originalism. it asserts that laws must be interpreted as they were understood by the men who wrote them. in 2006, justice elena kagan, then the dean of hear extraordinary law school, scalia's alma mater says he is the justice who has had the most important impact over the years on how we think and talk about law. he originally coauthored a new book, it is called reading law, the interpretation of legal text. i am very honored to have justice scalia back on this program. so the first book was about arguing, how to make the case arguing the case. this is called reading law, the interpretation of legal
the road to the city's airport. the u.s. soldier accused of espionage in the wikileaks document dump has conceded he considered suicide after his arrest. private first class bradley manning was cross-examined today in a pre-trial hearing at fort meade, maryland. he admitted making a noose out of bed sheets before being sent to the u.s. marine corps brig at quantico, virginia. manning says his treatment there was so harsh, the charges should be dismissed. the military says manning was a suicide risk, so jailers kept him isolated and took away his clothes. the holders of half of that record powerball jackpot of $588 million came forward today in missouri. a 52-year-old mechanic, mark hill, and his wife cindy were introduced in dearborn, just north of kansas city. cindy hill said she couldn't believe at first that their ticket was a winner. >> i didn't have my glasses and i was thinking is that the right numbers, is that the right numbers. and i was shakingment and i called my husband. i said i think i'm having a heart attack. and i drove to my mother-in-law's house to let her verify what i
staff for their own safety. those who remain will be restricted to the capital city, damascus. separately, the u.s. voiced mounting concern about activity at syrian government sites storing chemical weapons. this afternoon, president obama warned syrian leader bashar al- assad not to cross that line. oday i want to make it absolutely clear to assad and those under his command, the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences. and you will be held accountable. >> sreenivasan: in response, syria's government released a statement saying it would never use chemical weapons on its own people. the regime has never confirmed it has such weapons. there were warnings about greater curbs on the internet, as the world's nations gathered today for a summit on telecommunications. the 11-day conference in dubai is the first such review since 1988, well before the web was fully formed. the u.s. has raised concerns that china, russia, and others will seek new limits on
, a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: robert gates is here, hhe has had a distinguished career in public service spanning six decades and served under eight presidents from lyndon johnson to barack obama. >> he took the top job in 1991 under george h.w. bush, president of texas a & m university from 2002 to 2006 when president george w. bush appointed him secretary of defense. president obama asked him to stay at the pentagon making him the first defense secretary to serve in both a republican and the democratic administration, he left his post in june, 2011. at his farewell ceremony president obama awarded him the presidential award of freedom. >> the highest honor. >> this is a man i have come to know and respect. a humble american patriot. a man of common sense and decency. quite simply one of our nation's finest public servants. >> rose: today the united states face as wave of foreign policy challenges, including the pressing question of how to respond to the potential use of chemical w
/schiller home price index. the survey tracks 20 metropolitan cities, and shows home prices were up 3% year over year in september. compared to august, prices inched up three-tenths percent higher. together, analysts say the numbers add up to a long recovery for housing. >> the housing market has clearly turned the corner and is well on its way to recovery. it's going to be a slow, steady, recovery rather than a booming, explosive recovery, because we still have a few years of distressed inventory we have to work through and some headwinds in the lending market. >> tom: nationally, prices are back to their mid-2003 levels. but they're still down 30% from the peak of the housing bubble. >> susie: last summer's drought fried much of the nation's corn crop, but it didn't scorch interest in owning farmland. in many parts of the corn belt, farmland values jumped 13% over the past three months, according to the chicago federal reserve bank. as diane eastabrook reports, a growing number of investors from pension funds to mutual funds are making farms a hot commodity. >> reporter: to a small but growing
york city's lincoln center, ford introduced the new lincoln mkz sedan, one of four luxury, and fuel efficient models coming out over the next four years. >> no one offers a car that's more fuel he fishant than the this hybrid no one offers a vehicle with the kind of craftsmanship and beautifully skimp find interior that we val. and when you drive it, it's going to be as fun to drive as a bmw but as quiet and comfortable at a lexus. >> susie: this is ford's latest campaign to stage a comeback for lincoln. when i talked to the c.e.o. alan mall ally i asked him if this is his last push to save the brand. >> we haven't focused on lincoln over the last few years because we had these other luxury brands. i think this is almost a beginning because now everybody knows that what ford did with ford, and now they all know ford is going to be 100% laser focused on lincoln. >> susie: when people think of a luxury car they think mercedes, bmw, not a lincoln. so how are you going to compete against those upscale brands? >> less than ten years ago lincoln was the number one luxury brand in the unit
captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: lakhdar brahimi is here n august he replaced kofi annan as u.s. enjoy to syria, one of the most experienced diplomats in the world. he's deeply familiar with arab affairs. during the 198 0s he was undersecretary general of arab league. in the 1990s he served as algeria's foreign minister. after that he was special envoy to afghanistan and then to iraq post saddal hussein. when he became envoy to syria earlier this year he described his mission as quote nearly impossible. he is in new york this week to report to the united nations and security council on that mission and on the situation in syria. i'm pleased to have him back at this table, welcome. >> thank you very much. >> rose: you must be exhausted. >> i'm all right. >> rose: what will you say to the united nations. >> you know what, i'm going to tell them what i have been saying all along about the situation in syria is extremely bad. and dangerous. and getting worse. until now nobody has found a way of bringing it unde
by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. rose: marion cotillard is here. she came to fame with her oscar-winning performance in 2007's film le vie rose." she was in this summer's batman movie. sewing magazine called her a french siren with hollywood appeal. in her new movie, she plays a trainer who survives a devastating desperate. here's the trailer for the film. ♪ ♪ >> rose: i am pleased to have marion cotillard at this table for the very first time. welcome. >> thank you. >> rose: and congratulations. >> thank you very much. thank you for having me. >> rose: tell me about this. there was a director you wanted to work with. >> yes. >> rose: interesting story. some challenge from playing an amputee. but what was overwhelming for you? was it the theme? was it what? >> well, nothing was overwhelming. you know, when-- and i never see my job as a challenge. sometimes you have to work on things that are kind of hard to get, but if you have time to work and working with jacques cottier, who such a genius, makes things easier. no, i fell in love wi
the whole city. >> "al qaeda in yemen." >> frontline continues online. explore the reporting on "cell tower deaths" from our partners at propublica, more about who's responsible for a worker's safety from osha's jordan barab, and read at&t's statement to frontline. get insights into working at mf global from a former broker. >> sipping the kool-aid at that time. >> learn more about the volckr rule, and follow frontline on facebook and twitter, or tell us what you think at pbs.org/frontline. >> frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major funding is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. and by reva and david logan, committed to investigative journalism as the guardian of the public interest. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by tfrontline journalism fund, supporting investigative reporting and enterprpr
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)